Originally published Monday, August 19, 2019 at 09:05p.m.

My friend, Bob, called the other day, saying that he had a visitor and he and his cat were not quite sure what to do with it.

A fellow working in the yard found this tortoise (pictured). Bob was hoping that I might have an answer for him. I did not. I made a few suggestions, so he began calling. He called Animal Control, the Humane Society, the Heritage Park Zoological Sanctuary, which is a rescue zoo; they all passed him on to someone else.

He was finally directed to call the Prescott City Police, which sent out the Animal Control officer. She took a photo that she sent to a resource who verified that the creature was indeed wild. She took the guy with her.

Bob subsequently learned that it is not legal to keep tortoises without a permit. The officer assumed that this animal had been kept as a pet and was able to escape; thus, ending up in his yard. He also learned that tortoises do live up here and hibernate over the winter.

I have never seen a tortoise here, but I would assume that they are not easy prey for a coyote!

PREMARIN

Totally unrelated, and not exactly a pet issue, but pet lovers are certainly concerned about the treatment of all animals.

A bunch of years ago, my doctor prescribed Premarin for me at that time in my life. I followed his directions until I discovered what that name meant and all that was involved. I immediately refused to take it any longer. Today in the mail, I received this information piece. Very informative and disgusting.

I learned long ago that Premarin was harvested from the urine of pregnant mares. It is all in the name. Premarin - PREgnant MARes urINe. They did not make much effort to hide the source, but we women were just following our doctor’s orders.

Being a horse lover, I was very distressed by this total abuse of mares. But while it was on my mind for a while and I did stop taking the drug, I never expressed my frustration and it kind of slipped my mind. Time to speak up!

Premarin is prescribed for post-menopausal women. I guess all of us gals at that age and beyond are familiar with the drug. But are we familiar with where it comes from?

So many drugs are prescribed today, it is hard to keep up and most of us do not question what the doctor prescribes for us. But should we?

Just think about what goes into the production of this drug. The mares are impregnated and tied in narrow stand-only stalls with this bag attached to them that collects the urine. Gestation is about 11 months for horses. I also just read that their water supply is limited so that their urine is more concentrated.

Eventually, they give birth – and very soon, these babies are taken from them – most of them are sent to a feed lot for fattening up and then they are sent to slaughter. Just too awful to think about. Then the mares are immediately impregnated again and the miserable life continues.

Now they are discovering that these pills cause health problems for the women who are taking them. The FDA has stated that Premarin may cause cancer, heart attack, stroke and other deadly side effects. So why is it still on the market?

There are alternative drugs for post-menopausal women. I hope everyone learns the facts. There is an organization trying to end this disgusting practice, Dreamchaser Horse Rescue and Rehabilitation. Check it out!

That’s it for today folks. Stay tuned! Never a dull moment!

Christy Powers is a freelance writer whose passion is studying and writing about pet health, nutrition and training. She can be reached at cpowerspak@gmail.com.